Places of Interest

Palaces

Grand Master’s Palace and Armoury 

Auberge de Baviere Palace

Towards the end of the 17th century a large residential palace was built facing the entrance of Marsamxett Harbour. This was Palazzo Carniero, built to the design of the Maltese born Carlo Gimach. Eventually the building was used by the future Grand Master, Marc’Antonio Zondadari. During the second half of the 18th century, the Anglo-Bavarian Langue was instituted, and this palace was bought to be used as their auberge. The building is imposing, with its balanced façade dominated by the open balcony above the main doorway. The design gave the building a sense of stability. Beneath the building a rock-cut shelter was excavated, offering shelter to the locals living in the area during the many air-raids of World War Two. During the 20th century this building was used as a primary school.


Carniero Palace

Towards the end of the 17th century, a large residential palace was built on the hill overlooking the entrance to the Port of Marsamxett. This was the Carniero Palace, and was built on the design of the Maltese architect Carlo Gimach. Later, this palace was used by the future Grand Master, the Italian knight Fra Marc’Antonio Zondadari. In the second half of the 18th century, the Anglo-Bavarian Language was founded, and this palace was bought to be used as the Auberge of this Language. The building is large and impressive, with a balanced façade, and dominated by an open gallery located on the main door. The design of this palace offers a sense of stability. Under the same building shelters were dug in the rocks, to offer shelter to the locals who lived here for during the many airstrikes during World War II. In the 20th century this building was used as a primary school for children in Valletta.

Auberge d’Aragon

he 19th century. The Protestant Bishop of Malta and Gibraltar used to reside in this building. When Malta was given independence in 1964, this became the Office of the Prime Minister. It remained so until the early 1970s when the office was moved to the Auberge of Castile. Today it is being used by one of the Ministries. 

Il-Berġa ta’ Aragona

L-ewwel bereġ li inbnew fuq id-disinji ta’ Glormu Cassar, il-perit Malti li kien qed jaħdem għall-Ordni ta’ San Ġwann fil-bini tal-Belt Valletta. Din il-berġa hija l-unika waħda li tagħtina ideja kif il-bereġ kienu jidhru oriġinarjament: binja b’sular wieħed, kantunieri id-dekorati, u xejn aktar dekorazzjonijiet. Il-berġa għandha portiku li ġie miżjud fis-seklu 19. L-isqof Protestant ta’ Malta u Ġibiltà kien għamel żmien joqgħod f’din il-binja. Hekk kif Malta ingħatat l-Indipendenza fl-1964, din il-berġa saret l-Uffiċju tal-Prim Ministru. Baqgħet tintuża hekk sal-bidu tas-sebgħinijiet, meta l-uffiċju tal-Prim Ministru mexa lejn il-Berġa ta’ Kastilja. Illum, il-Berġa ta’ Aragona tintuża bħala uffiċju ministerjal


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One of the largest surviving auberges built by the Knights is that of Italy. The original building was designed by Gerolamo Cassar, and the building had additions made to it in the second half of the 17th century. It was during the time of Grand Master Gregorio Carafa that the ornate façade was added. The imposing and well-balanced façade is crowned with impressive marble work, showing the bust of the Grand Master surrounded by a trophy of arms. It is believed that the marble used for this decoration was brought from Mtarfa, from the ruins of a Roman temple dedicated to Prosperina. The present façade was built to the designs of Mederico Blondel, the French resident architect of the Order. Presently the building houses MUZA, the Malta National Community Art Museum.


The Auberge of Italy

The original building was built to the design of Glormu Cassar, and in the 17th century the building had several additions to it. It was at the time of Grand Master Gregorio Carafa that the decorative façade was added. The large, balanced façade is decorated with marble ornaments, depicting the bust of Grand Master Carafa, surrounded by many carvings of arms and flags, known as the trophy of arms. It is understood that the marble used for the decoration on the façade is derived from the remains of a Roman temple in Mtarfa, dedicated to Proserpine. The present façade was built on the design of the architect Mederico Blondel, a French resident architect, of the Order of St. John. The building is currently in use by MUSEUM, the National Museum of Community Art.

Auberge of Provence

The Langue of Provence built their first auberge around 1571. The architect was Gerolamo Cassar. It was a one-storey building, and probably was even smaller than at present. Eventually, during the 17th century, the Langue commissioned the French architect Mederico Blondel to design the present façade. The building was also enlarged, and the presumed small square in front of the building was built over. The façade is monumental, and it is very balanced. The corners are typical of Cassar’s style, which Blondel retained. In between the ground floor and the upper floor, a mezzanine level was inserted. The ground floor was planned to have shops. This building is considered as one of the finest Mannerist buildings that we have in Malta. During the 19th century the building was used as a guest house and as a social club. It was taken over by the then Museum Department, and nowadays it is the National Museum of Archaeology.

 
Museums
National Museum of Achaeology 
Nation Museum of Fine Arts
The Palace Armoury
War Museum
Casa Rocca Piccola
Toy Museum
 
Tourists Attractions
Manoel Theatre 
MITP Theatre
Mediterranean Conference Centre
Fort St. Elmo
The Siege Bell Memorial
National Library
Fortifications
St. James Cavalier