Churches

  • St John’s Co-Cathedral (St John’s Square)

  • ​St. Francis of Assisi (Republic Street)

  • Parish Church of St. Augustine (Old Bakery Street)

  • Sanctuary Basilica of Our Lady of Mount Carmel

  • Carmelite Church (Old Theatre Street)

  • St Paul’s Anglican Cathedral
    Dominating the skyline of Valletta from the Marsamxett Harbour side is the spire of the Anglican Cathedral, dedicated to St Paul. Through the generosity of Dowager Queen Adelaide, the church started to be built in 1839. The architect chosen was Richard Lankesheer, but soon afterwards his work was showing structural defects. He was replaced with William Scamp, who carried out various alterations and completed the work of the Anglican Cathedral. The Cathedral has got a neo-classical façade with Ionic columns. The Cathedral was inaugurated in 1844, although the bell tower was completed some years later. William Scamp was honoured by Queen Adelaide for his work in seeing the completion of the Anglican Cathedral in Valletta.

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  • Church of Christ Redeemer 

  • Church of the Jesuits 

  • Church of St. Paul's Shipwreck (St Paul Street)
    The first church dedicated to the Shipwreck of St Paul was built on another site in Valletta. With the arrival and establishment of the Jesuit Order in Malta, towards the end of the 16th century the church was handed over to the Jesuit Order and a new church was built in the location where we find the present church. In 1639 it was decided that a larger church should be built designed by the Maltese architect Bartolomeo Garagona. The dome was the work of Lorenzo Gafà`, while the present façade was added in the 19th century and it was designed by Nicola Zammit. The interior of the church is richly decorated with works by Matteo Perez d’Aleccio, Antoine Favray and Attilio Palombi. The titular statue of St Paul is considered as one of the masterpieces of Baroque statuary, the work of the Maltese Melchiorre Gafà.

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  • ​Church of St. Mary of Jesus 

  • Scots Church of St. Andrew 

  • Church of Our Lady of the Pilar 

Attached to the Auberge of Aragon is the national church of the Langue of Aragon, dedicated to Our Lady of Pilar. The church was built in 1670 through the generosity of Fra Felice Innigues de Ayerbe, who eventually was to be the only person to be buried inside the church. The interior was decorated through the generosity of the Bali of Majorca, Fra Raimondo de Soler. After the earthquake of 1693, during which it suffered some structural damage, Romano Carapecchia was commissioned to rebuild the dome and to add a new façade to the church. Due to the narrowness of the street, the façade cannot be really appreciated. The interior of the church is richly decorated with sculptures and paintings. The titular painting is by Stefano Erardi.

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  • ​Church and Monastery of St. Catherine 

  • Parish Church of Our Lady of Fair Heavens and St. Dominic 

  • Church of St. Mary Magdalene 

  • Church and Chapel of St. Anne 

  • Chapel of Sacra Infermeria (Mediterranean Conference Centre)
                  
  • Church of St. Nicholas
    During the 1570s a church dedicated to St Nicholas of Bari started being built by the Greek community. The same church was handed over to the Confraternity of All the Souls in Purgatory in 1639, and this led to the church being referred to by the name of the Confraternity. In 1652 the church was rebuilt to the designs of Francesco Buonamici, and Lorenzo Gafa was working as a sculptor during the building of the church. One can notice the large stone statue of St Nicholas on the façade. The church was built in a Greek cross plan.  The titular painting is by Mattia Preti, executed during his first stay in Malta in 1659. The church was damaged during World War Two. The reconstruction of the church was entrusted to Joseph Sammut.

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  • Church of St. Roch (St Ursula Street)

  • Church and Monastery of St. Ursula (St Ursula Street)

  • Church of Our Lady of Damascus 

  • Church of St. James 

  • Church of St. Barbara 
    The church dedicated to St Barbara was built by the Langue of Provence. The first church was small, but in the 18th century it was pulled down and a new church was built on the designs of the Italian architect Romano Carapecchia. The façade is plain with two free standing Ionic columns. Above the main entrance is a statue of the Immaculate Conception, placed there at the beginning of the 20th century. The interior of the church is well balanced, and it has a titular painting by Antoine Favray, showing the Martyrdom of St Barbara. The church used to host the Confraternity of Bombardiers, as St Barbara is the patron saint of gunners.

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  • Church of St. Catherine of Italy (Victory Square)

  • Church of Our Lady of Victories (South Street)

  • Church of the Blessed Virgin of Notre Dame De Liesse (Liesse Hill)

  • Church of the Holy Family's Flight from Egypt 

  • Church of St Lucy

  • ​Church of Our Lady of Porto Salvo and St Dominic
    Soon after the start of the building of the new city of Valletta, a small church dedicated to Our Lady of Porto Salvo was built by a few Dominican priests. The first church was designed by Gerolamo Cassar. Extended during the following years, it was eventually decided that it was not stable, and at the beginning of the 19th century a new church was built. The present building was designed by Antonio Cachia. The façade of the church is in a concave form, and it is decorated with a number of sculptures, amongst which is a copy of the bronze bust of Pope St Pius V, one of the great benefactors of the new city of Valletta. The interior is richly decorated with works by Giuseppe Cali, who was baptised in the same church. The processional statue of St Dominic is a 17th century work of Spanish art.
     
  • ​Church of the Presentation of Our Lady in the Temple
    The site has an interesting history. Originally a building which was donated to a group of women who were taking care of young girls stood here. The building was donated by a noble family after a vow they had made, to have their son healed. Towards the beginning of the 17th century a small church was added to the monastery. Eventually, after the women residing in the building were officially recognized as a religious order, a bigger monastery was erected and dedicated to St Catherine. It was in 1714 that the present church was built to the designs of Romano Carapecchia. The architect managed to create a dynamic façade on the restricted site. The interior of the church is richly decorated. The titular painting is by Enrico Arnaud.

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  • ​Church of St. Catherine of Alexandria 
    Adjoining the Auberge of Italy is the imposing church dedicated to St Catherine of Alexandria. The original structure was built to the designs of the Maltese architect Gerolamo Cassar. During the 18th century, the Italian Langue commissioned Romano Carapecchia to upgrade their national church. The façade is dominated by the portico that was the work of this Italian architect. This was an innovative idea for local church architecture, providing the church with an imposing façade. Carapecchia was also responsible for the building of the present dome and other decorations within the church. The titular painting is a fine work by the Italian artist Mattia Preti. It shows the Martyrdom of St Catherine of Alexandria, a favourite subject with Preti. The church has a painting by Benedetto Luti, showing Our Lady of Sorrows.

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  • ​Church of Our Lady of Victories (South Street)

  • Church of the Blessed Virgin of Notre Dame De Liesse (Liesse Hill)

  • Church of the Holy Family's Flight from Egypt 

  • Church of St Lucy

  • Church of Our Lady of Victory
    This is known to be the first church to have been built in the new city of Valletta. Traditionally it is also held that the ceremony of the foundation stone of Valletta is located here. The church, dedicated to Our Lady of Victory, was built by Grand Master Jean de Valette, the hero of the Great Siege of 1565 and the founder of the city of Valletta. Built in 1566 the first church was small, and it was to be the resting place of its founder Grand Master de Valette when he died in 1568. The church was enlarged more than once in the following years and more altars were added. The present façade dates to the 18th century, and it is adorned with a bronze bust of Pope Innocent XII, a former Inquisitor in Malta. In 1716 Alessio Erardi was commissioned to decorate the nave of the church with various scenes from the Life of the Virgin. Towards the end of the 18th century, a monument to the Venetian Admiral, Angelo Emo, was erected after the death of the admiral in Malta. 

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  • Church of our Lady of Liesse 
    The national church of the French Langue was built outside the fortifications of Valletta, close to the harbour. The church, dedicated to Our Lady of Liesse, was first constructed in 1620. The present building dates to the 18th century, when the church was rebuilt to the designs of Andrea Belli. The façade is well balanced, with a central decorated window about the entrance.  The dome of the church and its adjacent bell tower are very prominent. The church has three altars, and the apse is richly decorated. The titular painting is by Enrico Arnaud, considered his best work. Behind a marble tablet in the church, the heart of Vicomte de Beaujolais, the brother of King Louis Philippe of France, is buried.

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  • Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church 
    Facing the waterfront of Vittoriosa is a small church dedicated to Our Lady of Mount Carmel. The original church was built in 1611 and was offered to be run by the Carmelite Order. Due to the small number of priests serving in the church, in 1653 the church was handed over to the Bishop of Malta. The church was eventually restored and was supported by the galley crews of the fleet of the Order of St John. During the Second World War the church was severely damaged, and subsequently rebuilt. It is unfortunate that the original architect of the church is not known, as some of the interior decorations indicate that it was of high standard. In the past the galley crews used to organise a procession during Holy Week from this church. They would be all dressed up in black, and some of them would also be wearing hoods over their heads, although prisoners were still chained.

  • Basilica of Saint Dominic

  • Orthodox Church of St George

  • St Magdalene's Church

  • Knisja ta 'Agios Nikolaos